The majority of crops in the province are in fair to good condition.  Provincially, 56 per cent of fall cereals, 61 per cent of spring cereals, 58 per cent of oilseed crops and 60 per cent of pulse crops are at their normal stages of development for this time of year.

Most of the province received rainfall this week, but it was not enough to improve soil moisture conditions or to offset the effects of the current heat wave.  Cooler temperatures and a good wide spread rain is needed for the entire province.

Rainfall in the province ranged from nothing to 28 mm in the Vonda area.  Moisture levels sharply declined this week.  Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as zero per cent surplus, 31 per cent adequate, 42 per cent short and 27 per cent very short.  Hay and pasture land topsoil moisture is rated as zero per cent surplus, 24 per cent adequate, 36 per cent short and 40 per cent very short.

Haying operations are off to a delayed start in the province due to cool temperatures and moisture limitations early in the season.  For most producers this year’s hay crop did not reach a satisfactory quantity or quality.  Hay quality is currently rated as seven per cent excellent, 38 per cent good, 45 per cent fair and 10 per cent poor.

Producers hope that the heat will break.  Rain is needed to improve crop and pasture growth, especially in the areas that did not receive much rain prior to this week.

The majority of crop damage reported was from heat, dry winds, extremely dry soil conditions, insects and gophers.

Producers are busy finishing crop herbicide applications, moving cattle to market, scouting for pests and fixing equipment and beginning haying operations in some areas.

A complete, printable version of the Crop Report is available online at https://www.saskatchewan.ca/crop-report.

Follow the 2021 Crop Report on Twitter at @SKAgriculture.

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