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Like you, I just finished watching the federal election.

I could say, I’m finished with federal elections – and that would be a whole rant on its own.

Or I could say, its time to work together.

We hear plenty of both surrounding us.

Here’s my take:

There were a few candidates that were there on a lark – an older colloquialism meaning they probably had one of those late night bar hops and decided to hop into the election for fun. And maybe the fun was there for them. The votes weren’t.

Most candidates had a vision for the good of the people.

As I moderated an all-party forum, the passion was evident. Both from the floor and from the candidates. There was no lack of opinion and perhaps a little bit of incivility, where drips of sarcasm or backhanded non-compliments were served up.

In the end, the map of Canada was coloured with swathes of blue and red. Another colour invaded the province of Quebec and there were pinpoints of other jues across the provinces and territories.

The ranting voices had “home countries” where they felt safe haven. Lobbing personal insults and crying moral injustice from the safety of their own fireplace just stoked raging infernos.

Justin Trudeau, in prime ministerial fashion, has set forth a conciliatory tone while maintaining some tones of firmness that show a boldness of conviction. The other parties are of the same conviction – although their convictions are different.

I’m coming to see our current approach to reconciliation as an item by item approach. In older definition of tolerance this was the acceptable approach – we agreed to disagree and allow the majority to rule. The presumption was (and is) that the majority would protect the minority.

We’ve tried to enshrine this in bills of rights, or constitutions, or through legal parameters. Once again – stirred up jealousy, overarching superiority, and even covetous motivations have found ways around the spirit of the law and into proclaiming the letter of the law for selfish gain.

Let’s strike at the root of the matter – the heart is the true subject of reconciliation. We might have figured out compromise on small issues, or give-and-take to gain a win-win situation. But where there is no love of others, including our enemies, there is no true reconciliation.

Can our country find its way to love?

Read more by Ron HERE

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Ron Baker
Ron Baker is a recently retired (2005) member of the Kindersley community. His roots run deep – his grandfather homesteaded just outside Kindersley in the early 1900's. Ron was born in the old Kindersley Hospital, has made his home in various other communities over the years, but keeps coming back. Committed to the community, Ron has found his local involvement has proved to be great fodder for some hilarious tales and tragic events. His experience in administration and working with people, along with his love for a good story, ought to help to bring daily life to life! Ron blogs at ronbaker.ca, and is pleased to be a part of the writing “crew” at Kindersley Social.